Cancer Research Seminar Virtual Classroom

Up next! 9/9 – Regan Stephenson and Annabella Maria Galang will present: “Cancer Immunotherapy: Past, Present and Future.”

Cancer research seminars will meet virtually using the Zoom platform on the second Wednesday of each month from 4:30 – 5:30pm.  Community members who wish to participate in classes should send an email to Bob Riter at RNR45@cornell.edu for login information. These seminars are an on-going collaboration between CRC & cancer researchers at Cornell. The presentations are in lay language and questions are encouraged. Everyone is welcome! For more info &/or to be added to the distribution list for weekly reminders, email Bob Riter.
Website Please visit our Website  & Facebook page. There are sections targeted to community members and students, and one that encourages the development of partnerships in other communities. There’s also a twitter feed that highlights news that we think will be of interest to cancer researchers and the patient community. We”ll continue to add new content. In particular, we want to add profiles of many of our participants – both trainees and community members. #cancerresearchseminar #cornell #cancer #cornellcrccollaboration

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