Cancers by Type

We’ve compiled some especially helpful resources about each common type of cancer. We encourage you to browse through these sites because they present information in slightly different ways. We’re also happy to research specific questions for you. Please call us at 277-0960 or email info@crcfl.net.

Information from the American Cancer Society states that bladder cancer occurs when cells in the bladder start growing uncontrollably and eventually create a tumor or spread to other areas. The most common type of bladder cancer is called urothelial carcinoma, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). This cancer begins in the urothelial cells that line the bladder and other parts of the urinary tract.

The most common symptom of bladder cancer is blood in the urine.

A major risk factor is smoking. Smokers are 3 times more likely to get bladder cancer than nonsmokers. Other risk factors include exposure to industrial chemicals, dehydration, chronic bladder irritation or infection, and bladder birth defects.

Bladder cancer can be tested for with a cystoscopy, where a tube is placed through the urethra to examine its structure, a urine test or imaging tests.

Bladder cancer is often found at an early stage, when it is very treatable. The treatment options for those with bladder cancer are surgery, reconstruction, intravesical therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy.

Good Sources of Information:

#bladdercancer  #BCAM #bladdercancerawarenessmonth

A brain tumor occurs when there is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. The American Brain Tumor Association reports that nearly 80,000 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed this year. Tumors are known for interrupting normal activity like thinking, speaking, moving and breathing. Some are cancerous (malignant), while others are non-cancerous (benign).

Primary brain tumors start in the brain while metastatic begin elsewhere and move to the brain. Brain tumors appear in people of all ages, but primary brain tumors appear more frequently in children and older adults while metastatic brain tumors are more common in adults.

Symptoms of brain tumors include headaches, seizures, hearing or vision loss, fatigue, mood swings, and cognitive changes. When a brain tumor is suspected, doctors will often scan the brain for images that will inform a diagnosis. Many tests are commonly performed to confirm the presence of a brain tumor such as a neurological exam, DNA profiling, laboratory tests, and a biopsy procedure.

There are over a hundred different types of brain tumors. Factors that influence your likelihood in developing a brain tumor are race, age, gender, family history, genetic disorders, and exposure to formaldehyde, vinyl chloride, or acrylonitrile. Genetics and exposure to chemicals are factors for some but not all.

Depending on the type, location, size and grade of a tumor as well as the age and health of a patient, there are different treatment options for brain tumors. Common treatments include steroids, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, proton therapy, alternative and integrative medicine, and clinical trials.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group: 

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Brain Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Breast cancer occurs when cells begin to grow out of control. For women, most breast cancer begins in the ducts that carry milk to the nipple and some start in the glands that make breast milk; however, men can get breast cancer too. Breast cancer cells form a tumor that can often be felt as a lump. It's important to note that most breast lumps are not cancerous, but a healthcare professional should always confirm. Even still, not all breast cancers cause a lump. Breast cancer spreads when the cancer cells get into the blood or lymph system. There is a higher chance that the cancer cells will spread to other parts of the body if the cells spread to the lymph nodes first. It is important for women over 50 to receive an annual mammogram. Mammograms can detect cancers at its early stages often before symptoms develop or lumps appear. Find more information regarding breast cancer below.

Good Sources of Information

Breast Cancer Help


BreastCancerResourceGuideFEB2020


National Breast Cancer Organizations

National Organizations for Communities of Color

African American Breast Cancer Alliance

Sisters Network, Inc

Black Women's Health Imperative

Sisters By Choice

Breast Cancer in Men

Cervical cancer begins when cells lining the cervix—the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina—gradually develop abnormal changes. These cells become pre-cancerous and their abnormality can be ranked on a scale from 1 to 3, with 3 being the most serious pre-cancer. Though cervical cancer begins from these pre-cancerous cells, only some women who have abnormal cells will develop cervical cancer. Pre-cancerous cells go away without treatment in most women, but some do develop into invasive cancer.

 

Early cervical cancer and pre-cancer cells usually cause no symptoms. Screenings, however, are an effective way to find pre-cancer or cancer early when it is most treatable. In fact, treating cervical pre-cancers can prevent almost all cervical cancers. This is why women should get a routine Pap test to detect precancerous changes. Find more information regarding cervical cancer below.

 

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organization

  • Free cervical cancer screenings
    Free cervical screenings (pap/pelvic exams) are available for many women through the Cancer Services Program of Cortland and Tompkins Counties. For more information, call the Cortland County Health Department at 607-758-5523.

Support Groups

CRC's Support Groups

CancerCare:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Cancer in children is uncommon, but it does occur. The most common childhood cancers include leukemia, lymphoma, brain cancer, and bone cancer in teenagers. Childhood cancer has important differences than adult cancer. For one, children develop cancer for different reasons than adults. Doctors don't know why children get cancer most of the time, but it is likely due to random mutations in the genes of growing cells. Because of this, childhood cancers are difficult to prevent. Genetic conditions can sometimes increase the risk of cancer also.

Children respond well to treatment and unlike adults, most children with cancer get better. However, the side effects of treatments can be more severe and longer lasting in children. Treatments for children vary largely depending the child's age, cancer type, and severity of the cancer.

The effects of children with cancer do not stop with the child. Families may have difficulty coping emotionally and financially. Luckily, many resources exist to help children and families battling cancer. Find more information regarding childhood cancer below.

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Information for Teens

Information for Educators

National Support Organizations

Also known as colon or rectal cancer, colorectal cancer starts in the colon or the rectum and are often grouped together because they share many features. Colorectal cancer begins with growths, also known as polyps, on the inner lining of the colon or rectum. Not all polyps become cancer, but some do change to cancer over time depending on the type of polyp it is.

There are three types of polyps; adenomatous polyps sometimes change into cancer and are treated as precancerous. Sessile serrated polyps and traditional serrated adenomas have a risk of becoming cancer, so they are treated as precancerous also.

Individuals having a polyp larger than 1 cm, more than 3 polyps, or abnormal cells in the polyp or the lining of the colon or the rectum have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. If a polyp forms into cancer, it can grow into the many layers of the colon or rectum over time. The stage of the cancer is dependent on how deeply it has grown into the walls and if it has spread outside the colon or rectum.

The most common type of colorectal cancer is adenocarcinomas, indicating cancer formed in the cells that make mucus inside the colon and rectum. Regular screenings for people 45 and older can help detect colorectal cancer or pre-cancer. Find more information regarding colorectal cancer below.

Good Sources of Information

National Colorectal Support Organizations

The esophagus is a tube that connects the throat and the stomach. When you swallow food or liquids, they travel through the inside of the esophagus known as the lumen. Cancer of the esophagus begins when cells in the lining of the esophagus begin to grow out of control. It starts in the inner layer and grows outward through the other layers of the esophagus.

The layer that lines the inside of the esophagus is called the mucosa. Within the mucosa is the epithelium, the innermost lining of the esophagus, which is made of flat, thin cells. Most esophageal cancer begins in the epithelium and when the cancer starts in the cells of this inner-most layer, it is called "Squamous cell carcinoma." 

"Adenocarcinoma" is cancer that starts in the gland cells (cells that make mucus), often found in the lower third of the esophagus. Adenocarcinomas can start at the areas where the esophagus joins the stomach causing gastroesophageal junction tumors. Find more information regarding esophageal cancer below.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

The gallbladder is a small organ under the liver. It concentrates and stores bile, a fluid made in the liver that helps digest fats from food. When bile is made in the liver, it is either sent into a collection of thin tubes or "ducts" that move the bile into the small intestine or it is stored in the gallbladder and released later. Gallbladder cancer occurs when cells in the gallbladder grow out of control. However, gallbladder cancers are rare. When it does occur they are usually adenocarcinomas, cancer that starts in the gland cells that line many surfaces of the body.

 

Of note is papillary adenocarcinoma, which is a rare type of gallbladder cancer whose cells are arranged in finger-like projections. Generally, this type of cancer is less likely to spread and has better prognosis than most other kinds of gallbladder cancer.

 

A risk factor for gallbladder cancer is gallstones. However, gallstones are very common and gallbladder cancer is very rare. Some people undergo gallbladder removals and live very normal lives.

 

There are different parts of the bile duct system and cancer can form in any part of the system. For bile duct cancers, there are three types based on location. Intrahepatic bile duct cancer starts in the smaller bile ducts inside the liver. Sometimes this type of bile duct cancer is confused with cancer of the liver cells, but they are often treated the same way. Perihilar bile duct cancer starts in the larger ducts that are leaving the liver. Distal bile duct cancers start in the ducts closer to the small intestine. The most common type of bile duct cancer by cell type is adenocarcinomas, which starts in the gland cells lining the inside of ducts. Other types of bile duct cancers such as sarcomas or lymphomas are much less common.

 

Find more information regarding gallbladder and bile duct cancer below.

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Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

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National Support Organizations

Head and neck cancer can have many names, depending on where in the head and neck it starts. All of these cancers start when cells in the head or neck grow out of control. Head and neck cancer can start in the mouth and throat, the nasal cavity, or the sinuses. The most common type of head and neck cancer is called carcinoma. This type of cancer starts in cells that line the nose, mouth, and throat. Other head and neck cancers include: oral cavity (mouth), oropharyngeal (back of mouth or throat), nasal cavity (opening behind the nose), paranasal sinus (openings around or near the nose), nasopharyngeal (upper part of the throat behind the nose), laryngeal (voice box), and hypopharyngeal (lower part of the throat beside and behind the voice box). Find more information regarding head and neck cancer below.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

The kidneys are fist sized organs located behind the ribs with one on either side of the backbone. Their main job is to filter blood of excess water, salt, and waste products. The most common type of kidney cancer is renal cell carcinoma. This type usually grows as a single tumor within a kidney, but sometimes there can be two or more tumors in one kidney or tumors in both kidneys. Further, there are several subtypes of renal cell carcinomas. The most common type is clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which makes the cells look very pale or clear. The second most common subtype is papillary renal cell carcinoma, which forms little finger-like projections in the tumor. Other types of kidney cancers include transitional cell carcinomas, Wilms tumors, and renal sarcomas. Find more information regarding kidney cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

 #KidneyCancer #KidneyCancerMonth #KidneyCancerAwareness #FightAgainstKidneyCancer

Leukemias are cancers of the blood, which start in the cells that would normally develop into different types of blood cells. Leukemia most often starts in the early forms of white blood cells, but some start in other blood cell types. The several types of leukemias are divided based on whether it is fast growing (acute) or slower growing (chronic), and whether it starts in myeloid cells or lymphoid cells. Acute lymphocytic leukemia starts in the bone marrow where blood cells are made and is most common in children than adults. Acute myeloid leukemia also starts in the bone marrow, but is most common in older adults. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia starts in the white blood cells of the bone marrow and is the most common type of leukemia among adults. Other leukemias include chronic myeloid leukemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Find more information regarding leukemia below.

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National Support Organizations

Cancer that begins in the liver is called primary liver cancer. The most common type of primary liver cancer in adults is hepatocellular carcinoma. This type starts either as a single tumor that grows larger or as small cancer nodules throughout the liver. A type of cancer that starts in the cells that line the small bile ducts inside the liver is called bile duct cancer. Although this type of cancer usually starts outside the liver, it is usually treated the same way as liver cancer. Other liver cancers called angiosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma start in the cells lining the blood vessels of the liver. These types grow quickly and are often very hard to treat.

Secondary liver cancer is when cancer has spread or metastasized to the liver from somewhere else in the body. Because of this, these tumors are named and treated based on where they started in the body. The liver can also develop benign (noncancerous) tumors, which usually don't cause problems unless they grow large enough. Find more information regarding liver cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

Lung cancer forms when cells in the lungs begin to grow out of control. The main function of the lungs is to take in oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide when we breathe in and out, respectively. This process is done through a series of tubes that begins with the the splitting of the windpipe into bronchi, then forming smaller branches called bronchioles, and ending with tiny air sacs known as alveoli. Lung cancers most often begin in the cells that line the bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli.

There are 2 main types of lung cancers; the first is non-small cell lung cancer and the second is small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common type and can be divided into adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and large cell carcinoma depending on the lung cells they form in. Adenocarcinomas start in the cells that secrete substances such as mucus. This type is common among current and former smokers, but it is also the most common type of lung cancer found in non-smokers. The second main type of lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, tends to grow and spread faster than non-small cell, but it accounts for a much smaller percentage of all lung cancer. Find more information regarding lung cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

Live, Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live Lung Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Lymphoma is a cancer that starts in the cells of the body's immune system. Specifically, it starts in the white blood cells called lymphocytes. There are two main types: Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma starts in the lymph system, a part of the immune system that helps fight infections and other diseases. The lymph system is made up of two types of cells, B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. Treatment is based on which lymphocytes the lymphoma starts in and whether it is indolent (slow growing) or aggressive (fast growing).

Hodgkin's lymphoma starts in the lymph system similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but is treated differently than non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hodgkin's lymphoma most often starts in the B lymphocytes. Because lymph tissue is found in many parts of the body, Hodgkin's lymphoma can start almost anywhere. However, it usually starts in the lymph nodes in the upper part of the body. Within Hodgkin's lymphoma are two subtypes: classic Hodgkin's lymphoma (the most common out of the two) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma. 

Find more information regarding non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma below.

Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

Hodgkins Disease

National Support Organizations

Multiple myeloma is cancer of the plasma cells. Plasma cells are found in the bone marrow and are a part of the body's immune system. The immune system fights infections and other diseases. When the body responds to an infection, cells in the immune system mature to form plasma cells. Plasma cells make antibodies that help attack and kill germs, but when they become cancerous they produce an abnormal protein. This leads to difficulty fighting infections by the body. Further, overgrowth of plasma cells in the bone marrow, where other blood-forming cells reside also, can lead to low blood counts. Cancer in the plasma cells can also interfere with bone replacement in the body, leading to weak and easier to break bones. Finally, the abnormal protein produced by cancerous plasma cells can lead to kidney problems.

Other plasma cell disorders exist, but they do not meet the criteria to be classified as multiple myeloma. Find more information regarding multiple myeloma below.

Good Sources of Information

National Organizations

Ovarian cancer was previously believed to begin in the ovaries, but new evidence suggests that many ovarian cancers start in the far end of the fallopian tubes. Only found in females, ovaries are reproductive glands that produce eggs for reproduction. The eggs travel through the fallopian tubes to the uterus, where once fertilized it settles to develop into a fetus. Tumors can form out of any of the three cells found in the ovary.

Epithelial tumors form from the cells that cover the outer surface of the ovary; this is the most common ovarian tumor. Germ cell tumors form from the cells that produce the eggs. Stromal tumors form from the structural tissue cells that hold the the ovary together and produce the female hormones. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous), malignant (cancerous), or borderline (low cancerous potential). Malignant and borderline tumors can spread to other parts of the body, while benign tumors never spread beyond the ovary.

Cancer that begins in the fallopian tube is called fallopian tube cancer and is rare. It is similar to epithelial ovarian cancer and both are treated the same, but fallopian tube cancer has a slightly better outlook.

Find more information regarding ovarian cancer below.

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Local/Regional Support Organizations

National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Pancreatic cancer is cancer that begins when cells in the pancreas grow out of control. The pancreas is an organ that produces and releases enzymes to help break down and digest food. The enzymes are made by exocrine glands, which are made up of exocrine cells in the pancreas. The most common type of pancreatic cancer starts when exocrine cells grow out of control. This type is called pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

A less common type of pancreatic cancer starts in the endocrine cells, which make hormones such as insulin and glucagon. This type is called pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. This distinction is very important, because both types of pancreatic cancers have different symptoms, tests, and treatments.

Nonetheless, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is by far the most common type of pancreatic cancer. Most often, it begins in the ducts of the pancreas, but can also start in the cells that make enzymes. Some growths in the pancreas are benign, while others can become cancerous if left untreated. However, imaging test can detect these growths early on.

Find more information regarding pancreatic cancer below.

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Upstate New York Support

National Support Organizations

Prostate cancer begins when cells in the prostate start to grow out of control. The prostate is a gland only found in males that makes some of the fluid in semen. Almost all prostate cancers develop from the gland cells that make the fluid that is added to the semen. This type is called adenocarcinomas. All other types of cancers that can start in the prostate are rare.

Most prostate cancers grow very slowly, while some grow and spread quickly. Although not yet known for certain, it is believed that prostate cancer begins as a precancerous condition. One of these conditions is prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). In this condition, the gland cells of the prostate look abnormal, but they are not growing into other parts of the prostate. PIN is classified into low-grade and high-grade PIN, where high-grade PIN has a greater chance of developing into prostate cancer. PIN can begin in males as early as in their 20s, but many males with PIN never develop prostate cancer. Another precancerous condition is proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), characterized as smaller than normal prostate cells with signs of inflammation. PIA can sometimes lead to high-grade PIN or directly to prostate cancer.

Find more information regarding prostate cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

A sarcoma is a type of tumor. It is part of the name of a disease; it means the tumor is malignant or cancerous. Sarcomas are not common tumors, but they usually develop in soft tissues such as fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels, and deep skin tissues. Sarcomas are also common in bone. In general, sarcomas can be found in any part of the body, though they are most common in the arms and legs. There are more than 50 different types of soft tissue sarcomas. Adult fibrosarcoma, for example, affects fibrous tissue in the legs, arms, or trunk and is most common in people between the ages of 20 and 60. Another large classification of sarcomas includes intermediate soft tissue tumors. These tumors may grow and invade nearby tissues and organs, but they tend to not spread to other parts of the body. There are also benign soft tissue tumors. These tumors can start in the soft tissue, but they are not cancerous. Find more information regarding sarcomas below.

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More people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined. By age 70, one in five people are expected to develop skin cancer, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

All skin cancers start in the cells of the skin. It occurs when there are mutations in the DNA of skin cells. The three main types of skin cancer are basal cell skin cancers, squamous cell skin cancers and melanomas.

In most cases, skin cancer develops on the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. It can affect people of any skin tone. That being said, major risk factors include fair skin (less pigmented skin), sunburn history, excessive sun exposure, moles, exposure to toxic chemicals, and a weakened immune system.

Common ways to diagnose skin cancer are having a doctor perform a skin test or skin biopsy of a questionable area. Treatment for skin cancer is dependent on the stage, type, size, location, and general health of a given patient.

You can reduce your risk of skin cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. You can also help protect yourself by performing regular skin self-exams. Early detection is key in skin cancers, so if you notice any major changes in the appearance of your skin, contact your doctor.

Good sources of Information:

#MostCommonCancer  #skincancer #SkinCancerAwarenessMonth  #melanoma

Also known as gastric cancer, stomach cancer begins when cells in the stomach grow out of control. The stomach is an organ that holds food and starts to digest it by secreting gastric juice. The stomach wall has five layers and they are important in determining the stage of the cancer. Cancer in the stomach tends to develop slowly over time, with pre-cancerous changes often occurring beforehand. These precancerous changes often occur in the innermost lining of the stomach (the mucosa). These changes often go undetected, because they rarely cause symptoms. After many years these pre-cancerous changes can become cancer. The most common type of stomach cancer is adenocarcinoma, which develops in the cells forming the mucosa.

Lymphomas can also develop in the immune system tissue that is sometimes found in the wall of the stomach. Carcinoid tumors start in the hormone-making cells of the stomach. Other cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma can also start in the stomach, but are very rare.

Find more information regarding stomach cancer below.

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Testicular cancer begins when cells in the testicles grow out of control. The testicles are a part of the male reproductive system; they make male hormones and sperm, the male cells needed to fertilize a female egg. The testicles are made up of many types of cells. Depending on which cell the cancer starts in determines the type of testicular cancer it is. Most testicular cancers start in the germ cells, the cells where sperm is made, as tumors. These tumors are called germ cell tumors and can be classified as seminomas or non-seminomas. Seminomas grow and spread more slowly than non-seminomas, but both occur about equally. In fact, many testicular cancers contain both seminoma and non-seminoma cells, though they are treated as non-seminomas. Further, germ cell tumors can start as a non-invasive form of cancer called carcinoma in situ (CIS). In CIS, the cells look abnormal but they have not yet spread outside the walls of where the sperm is formed. This form does not always progress to invasive cancer. Less common in adults is stromal tumors, which are abnormalities found in the supportive and hormone-producing tissue (stroma) of the testicles. Cancer that starts in another organ and then spreads to the testicles is called secondary testicular cancer, though it is not true testicular cancer because it did not start in the testicles. Find more information regarding testicular cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

Thyroid cancer begins when cells in the thyroid grow out of control. The thyroid gland makes hormones that help regulate heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. It is located in the front part of the neck below the thyroid cartilage (Adam's apple), but cannot be seen or felt in most people. The thyroid gland is mainly made of follicular cells and C cells. Follicular cells make thyroid hormone, which helps regulate metabolism. C cells make calcitonin, which helps control how the body uses calcium. Different cancers develop from each kind of cell and can start with growths and tumors in the thyroid gland. Most growths are non-cancerous such as an enlarged thyroid or nodule, but others are malignant or cancerous.

The most common type of thyroid cancer is differentiated thyroid cancer. The cells in this type of cancer look a lot like normal thyroid tissue. Within this category the most common type is papillary cancer. Papillary cancer grows very slowly, but often spreads to the lymph nodes in the neck. However, they are often treated successfully and are rarely fatal. Much less common is medullary thyroid cancer, which is more difficult to find and treat. Finally, anaplastic thyroid cancer is the most rare form of thyroid cancer. Find more information regarding thyroid cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

Uterine or endometrial cancer begins when cells in the inner lining of the uterus (endometrium) start to grow out of control. The uterus is an organ where a fetus grows and develops when a woman is pregnant. It has two parts: the upper part called the body and the lower part that connects the uterus to the vagina called the cervix. The body has two main layers: the myometrium is the outer layer that is a thick layer of muscle and the endometrium is the inner layer that nourishes an embryo. The most common type of uterine cancer starts in the cells of the endometrium.

Most uterine cancers are adenocarcinomas, and endometrioid cancer is the most common type of adenocarcinoma. This type starts in the gland cells and looks like normal uterine lining. Endometrioid cancer is graded based on how much the cancer cells are organized into glands that look like the glands found in healthy endometrium. In grades 1 and 2, more cancer cells form glands. In grade 3, more of the cancer cells are disorganized and do not form glands. The grades of endometrioid cancer then translates to the type of uterine/endometrial cancer.

Grades 1 and 2 endometrioid cancer is type 1 uterine/endometrial cancer, which is not very aggressive and spreads more slowly. Higher grade endometrioid cancer is type 2 uterine/endometrial cancer, which has a poorer outlook. Further, cancer can also start in the muscle layer of the uterus (myometrium). This type is called uterine sarcoma.

Find more information regarding uterine cancer below.

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National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.