Cancers by Type

We’ve compiled some especially helpful resources about each common type of cancer. We encourage you to browse through these sites because they present information in slightly different ways. We’re also happy to research specific questions for you. Please call us at 277-0960 or email info@crcfl.net.

Information from the American Cancer Society states that bladder cancer occurs when cells in the bladder start growing uncontrollably and eventually create a tumor or spread to other areas. The most common type of bladder cancer is called urothelial carcinoma, or transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). This cancer begins in the urothelial cells that line the bladder and other parts of the urinary tract.

The most common symptom of bladder cancer is blood in the urine.

A major risk factor is smoking. Smokers are 3 times more likely to get bladder cancer than nonsmokers. Other risk factors include exposure to industrial chemicals, dehydration, chronic bladder irritation or infection, and bladder birth defects.

Bladder cancer can be tested for with a cystoscopy, where a tube is placed through the urethra to examine its structure, a urine test or imaging tests.

Bladder cancer is often found at an early stage, when it is very treatable. The treatment options for those with bladder cancer are surgery, reconstruction, intravesical therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy.

Good Sources of Information:

#bladdercancer  #BCAM #bladdercancerawarenessmonth

A brain tumor occurs when there is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. The American Brain Tumor Associationreports that nearly 80,000 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed this year. Tumors are known for interrupting normal activity like thinking, speaking, moving and breathing. Some are cancerous (malignant), while others are non-cancerous (benign).

 

Primary brain tumors start in the brain while metastatic begin elsewhere and move to the brain. Brain tumors appear in people of all ages, but primary brain tumors appear more frequently in children and older adults while metastatic brain tumors are more common in adults.

 

Symptoms of brain tumors include headaches, seizures, hearing or vision loss, fatigue, mood swings, and cognitive changes. When a brain tumor is suspected, doctors will often scan the brain for images that will inform a diagnosis. Many tests are commonly performed to confirm the presence of a brain tumor such as a neurological exam, DNA profiling, laboratory tests, and a biopsy procedure.

 

There are over a hundred different types of brain tumors. Factors that influence your likelihood in developing a brain tumor are race, age, gender, family history, genetic disorders, and exposure to formaldehyde, vinyl chloride, or acrylonitrile. Genetics and exposure to chemicals are factors for some but not all.

 

Depending on the type, location, size and grade of a tumor as well as the age and health of a patient, there are different treatment options for brain tumors. Common treatments include steroids, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, proton therapy, alternative and integrative medicine, and clinical trials.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group: 

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Brain Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organization

  • Free cervical cancer screenings
    Free cervical screenings (pap/pelvic exams) are available for many women through the Cancer Services Program of Cortland and Tompkins Counties. For more information, call the Cortland County Health Department at 607-758-5523.

Support Groups

CRC's Support Groups

 

CancerCare:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Good Sources of Information

Information for Teens

Information for Educators

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Colorectal Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Gall Bladder Cancer

Good Sources of Information

 

Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

 #KidneyCancer #KidneyCancerMonth #KidneyCancerAwareness #FightAgainstKidneyCancer

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Information Resources

National Support Organizations

Live, Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live Lung Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

Hodgkins Disease

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Organizations

Good Sources of Information

Local/Regional Support Organizations

National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

More people are diagnosed with skin cancer each year in the U.S. than all other cancers combined. By age 70, one in five people are expected to develop skin cancer, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

All skin cancers start in the cells of the skin. It occurs when there are mutations in the DNA of skin cells. The three main types of skin cancer are basal cell skin cancers, squamous cell skin cancers and melanomas.

In most cases, skin cancer develops on the areas of skin exposed to sunlight. It can affect people of any skin tone. That being said, major risk factors include fair skin (less pigmented skin), sunburn history, excessive sun exposure, moles, exposure to toxic chemicals, and a weakened immune system.

Common ways to diagnose skin cancer are having a doctor perform a skin test or skin biopsy of a questionable area. Treatment for skin cancer is dependent on the stage, type, size, location, and general health of a given patient.

You can reduce your risk of skin cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. You can also help protect yourself by performing regular skin self-exams. Early detection is key in skin cancers, so if you notice any major changes in the appearance of your skin, contact your doctor.

Good sources of Information:

#MostCommonCancer  #skincancer #SkinCancerAwarenessMonth  #melanoma

Good Sources of Information

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Good Sources of Information

National Support Organizations

Live Online Support Group:

Led by licensed oncology social workers, CancerCare's live, Gynecological Cancer Support Group offers the opportunity to connect with others who share similar concerns and experiences. Groups are available for residents of New York via video-conferencing and over the telephone.