April is Testicular Cancer Month

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 15-34.  The National Cancer Institute provides the following information about testicular cancer:

Testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in the testicles change and grow out of control, creating a tumor.  Most types of testicular cancer develop from germ cell tumors, or tumors that develop in the sperm-producing germ cells in the testicles. Many times other forms of cancer will start in another organ and spread to the testicles.

There are two types of germ-cell tumors that cause testicular cancer: seminona and non-seminoma. The most common sign of testicular cancer is a lump or swelling in the testicle.

Good news: most testicular cancers can be cured, even if they are diagnosed at an advanced stage.

Depending on the type, treatment for testicular cancer can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, or a combination of them.

A testicular exam is recommended as a part of routine cancer-related checkups. Otherwise, men can perform a testicular self-exam to locate any hard lumps or masses.

For more information about testicular cancer, we recommend these sources of information:

We also recommend these foundations and support organizations:

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